Returning to a place

“I’ve read that because of the drought and unseasonably warm temperatures, the fall foliage could be muted this year,” my friend said on a recent day hike.

That certainly seemed to be the case during our annual visit to Ricketts Glen State Park just days before. Although many of the leaves of the deciduous trees remained green, the foliage on most of the maples had turned a rusty brown; absent were the vibrant scarlets and vermillions we remembered from other autumns.

The lake was low as well, likely from the summer drought. The falls along Kitchen Creek, usually spectacular rushing cataracts, had turned to mere trickles over the shale rock formations. A few water striders darted about on the surfaces of shallow pools. Only the sky overhead remained a faultless blue.

I heard a couple of duck calls at eventide, but we saw none on the lake. Once, while sitting by the late afternoon campfire, I caught sight of the white triangular tail of a hawk as it disappeared through the trees. Only the chipmunks were out in force, chasing one another about the campsite. One made a hesitant approach to beg some crumbs, then scurried across the porch of our cabin to hide among the rocks.

Chickadees piped in the early mornings, and twice we noticed flocks of blackbirds rooting among the branches and leaves in the forest thickets.

Overnight the stars shone brightly, much more so than here at home.  We tagged Orion and his dogs, Taurus, the Seven Sisters, Castor and Pollux, Ursa Major and Minor, Cepheus and Cassiopeia. We rcalled the recent photos of Saturn’s rings and moons sent back across the solar system by Cassini before it plunged into the planet.

This morning I read that the fall foliage is supposed to be spectacular. Perhaps this year we had ventured into the wilds too early, I thought.

But no matter the color of her smock, nature still heals.

Sunrise, Lake Jean, 2017 © Thomas A. Doty

Dog days

“We need a dog,” my wife said.

“Not a good time for another dog,” I replied.

The memories of our deceased Jack Russell rough cut still loomed fresh in my mind. The Friday I came home after work, finding the dog pacing endless circles in the kitchen; the call to the veterinarian; the referral to the after-hours emergency veterinary service; the drive down, my wife holding the dog wrapped in a blanket in her arms. The vet watched the dog pace, suggested a shot of steroids, observation for 24 hours. We returned the next day to have the dog put down. She had paced the kitchen floor for 18 hours straight.

“No time for another dog,” I reiterated.

Two months later, after the Christmas holidays, my grown children bought a new puppy for my wife’s birthday: a dachshund-Yorkshire terrier mix. My wife took the 6-pound baby in her arms and christened her Daisy. And so we got a dog.

“We need a gate,” my wife said.

It was spring; the winter snows had melted. The snowdrops had blossomed; the crocuses were up. Daisy had explored the back yard along the paths my wife had shoveled through the deep snows. Now that the snows were gone and the paths with them, Daisy had taken to bolting down the driveway across the street and into the neighbor’s yard.

I pulled up the garage door and surveyed the scene: a collection of paraphernalia assembled over 40 years of marriage. My eyes considered the remnants of a former trellised archway, a length of 3-inch square pressure-treated lumber, a pair of hinges screwed to one of the studs by the sagging door, a roll of wire mesh, some aluminum trim. Gradually, an idea began to take shape in my mind. I gathered my tools from the basement and set myself to the task.

I measured the expanse between the edge of the house and the scalloped fence that ran along the northern border of our property, calculated the length and swing of the gate, cut the posts from scrap lumber and set them in the ground on either side of the driveway, secured the wire mesh with staples, trimmed the two trellises and mounted them with the old hinges on the posts.

Daisy watched while I worked, sniffing the boards, the wire, the wood shavings in turn. After I was done, I stood back with hands on hips to survey the completed work. Daisy regarded the structure, looked up at me, sniffed along the length of the gate, then promptly jumped over the top and bolted down the driveway into the neighbor’s yard across the street.

“You need to make it higher,” my wife said.

I salvaged the wood from a structure designed to support the growth of garden peas to add another tier atop the existing gate. The top of the gate was now even with the support posts. I stood back to survey my work. Daisy sat in the upper driveway, regarding the addition. Slowly, she approached, sniffed along the base of the structure, attempted to push her head beneath the lower tier, retracted, then promptly leaped over the gate and bounded down the driveway across the street into the neighbor’s yard.

“It’s not high enough,” my wife said.

“How high can a dachshund jump?” I asked.

“Higher than your gate,” she said.

I stood back and regarded the top tier. The wood had a series of holes bored into it to accommodate the strings that served as support lines for growing peas. I retreated to the back yard and lingered at my wife’s flower garden. The beds had been edged with series of black wrought iron pieces that formed a low fence. I pulled one section up, walked to the gate, and pushed the tines down through the existing holes in the top board. Miraculously, it fit. It also added an additional 8 inches in height to the gate.

“You’re not going to use my flower bed fence?” my wife said.

“Just an experiment,” I said. “To see if the dog can negotiate it.”

Daisy regarded the addition to the structure. Gingerly, she approached it, stood up on her hind quarters and placed her paws on the top wooden tier. She turned to look at me, then dropped back down, pacing along the gate. Finally, she sat and looked up. I stroked her floppy ears. She bounded off into the back yard and returned with a tennis ball.

Daisy sat by the gate and dropped the ball from her mouth. We both watched it roll under the gate down the long expanse of driveway into the street. It struck the far curb and came to rest.

“I guess that’ll do it,” I said, bending down to collect my tools. I carried them into the basement, stowed them in the workbench drawers and ascended the stairs. I washed up at the kitchen sink, poured myself a glass of cold water from the refrigerator and retreated to one of the rocking chairs on the front porch.

Life was good. I closed my eyes and let my mind wander. Shortly, I heard Daisy’s bark.

There she was, bounding about in the front yard, sniffing along the fence. Sharply, I called her name. She raised her head, froze momentarily, then dashed down through the bed of day lilies into the neighbor’s yard across the street.

My wife appeared at the screen door.

“She must’ve gotten out through the fence on the other side of the house,” she said. “You’ll have to make another gate.”